Resilience – Bouncing Back

After a Setback – Finding a New Normal

Reflecting
Reflecting

We are all human beings and thus subject to the ups and downs of living – because not even the richest or the smartest or the most positive can avoid suffering.

Suffering is our reaction to what we perceive are negative events. Our reaction is often to run away from and ignore these negative events or thoughts in the misguided hope that perhaps they won’t follow us or will get bored and move on to someone more deserving. Unfortunately, these things seem to have the tenacity of toilet paper on the bottom of a shoe.
Once we turn around and acknowledge the negative event, and really look at it with curiosity, it can lose its hold on us and its ability to make us suffer.

Controllable versus Uncontrollable

Negative events can often be divided up into those that are largely controllable and those that are beyond our control.
Where we can exert some measure of control – then a problem-focused coping style is most effective. Thus if you tend to be late for work then doing something to solve the problem, such as getting up earlier, arranging your clothing and lunch the night before; is the most effective coping strategy.
Where the negative event is beyond our control, then an emotion-focused coping approach will be more effective. This approach will help us deal with the emotions the stressor brings up; since we can’t change the situation itself. Thus if we are waiting for hours in a doctor’s office, the best approach would be to notice our emotions, and choose how we wish to respond and deal with our uncomfortable feelings
In our Therapeutic Knitting Group, we have recognized the wonderful ability of quiet knitting to fill up the hours of waiting time with productive and creative knitting. It is one of the tools that you can use to soothe and distract yourself in such situations. Another tool, that complements knitting, is the skill of Mindfulness.
Mindfulness allows you to become aware of your emotions, to reduce your stress and become better able to regulate your stress and emotions, if that is your intention. It allows you to adapt to rapid change; to know yourself better, and to transform yourself in the face of uncontrollable life events. Over time, it can adapt to your changing intentions, and allow self-exploration and ultimately transcendence. beyond the self to occur. It can strengthen your resilience.

Tips for Well-being
Tips for Well-being

 

We don’t offer you mindfulness as a cure for your disease. Rather it holds the possibility of vastly enriching your  life, helping you cope with symptoms and side effects, and improving the quality of your days. Mindfulness may also enhance your immune system’s performance and help reduce harmful levels of stress hormones in your body, changes that can only be beneficial.” (Ref: Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery, by Linda E. Carlson and Michael Speca)

Posted in Mindfulness, Resilience

Published by Francine

My name is Francine - I live in the Ottawa area and I am passionately interested in encouraging individuals to improve their well-being. I teach mindfulness, offer on-going meditation practice at the Farm and in other locations. At present, I offer Meditation practice at the Hyer Destination Yoga Studio in Embrun. I have established the first Therapeutic Knitting Group in Canada, based upon the research going on in the UK. I have lived on Twin Willows Farm for the last 17 years and I have enjoyed the constant presence and companionship of horses. They helped me to adapt to country life and slow down my tempo, so that I can savour the great things that are happening now in my life.